Safety Alerts

ICHCA International is committed to helping industry to learn lessons fast,

learn them once and make sure that they stay learnt. 

This information is intended to provide all organisations in the cargo supply chain with the opportunity to consider the events and to review and adapt their own health and safety control measures to proactively prevent future incidents.  We are grateful to all those who provide these alerts and acknowledge their commitment to sharing learning to benefit others.

Learning content like this is highly valuable as it is based on real-world experience.  We encourage everyone with publishable information about incidents to send it to us, so that we can raise awareness across the whole industry.  Please contact us at secretariat@ichca.com; sharing your insight could save a life or prevent injury.

Safety Alert: Dropped Cargo – high potential near miss

A Harbour Mobile Crane was in position to begin a discharge of a bulk Maize vessel and the associated Hopper was in the process of being set up in position.   The Crane Operator took a grab of maize from the vessel and suspended the full grab near the Hopper for a period of around 15-20 mins whilst the Hopper set up was completed. The Operator began to slew towards the vessel whilst opening the grab, having forgotten that a full grab had previously been taken from the hold, and once the cargo began to fall the Operator immediately closed the grab. However approximately 10 Tons of Maize had already fallen from a height of around nineteen meters damaging the Hopper outrigger. No injuries were sustained; however, two workers were operating within the immediate vicinity of the dropped cargo.   For full details click here   Please click here for previous Safety Alerts: https://ichca.com/safety-alerts We are grateful to the Port Skills & Safety for providing details. We acknowledge their commitment to sharing learning to benefit others. If you have similar operations, please share this information with managers, operatives and any potentially affected third parties as appropriate. Please also review any of your relevant operations for similar hazardous conditions, risks, and controls. Learning content like this is highly valuable as it is based on real-world experience. We encourage everyone with publishable information about incidents to send it to us, so that we can raise awareness across the whole industry. Please contact us at secretariat@ichca.com; sharing your insight could save a life or prevent injury.      

Safety Alert: Serious Injury – Fall From Height

A Mobile Plant Technician was to conduct routine maintenance work on a Straddle Carrier, simultaneously, the glass floor of the cabin was being replaced due to previous damage. As the Technician entered the cab, he was unaware that the floor grating had been raised with the glass floor removed and subsequently fell some 11m to the ground sustaining serious, potentially life changing, injuries.  He remains in ICU.   For full details, click here   Please click here for previous Safety Alerts: https://ichca.com/safety-alerts We are grateful to the Port Skills & Safety for providing details. We acknowledge their commitment to sharing learning to benefit others. If you have similar operations, please share this information with managers, operatives and any potentially affected third parties as appropriate. Please also review any of your relevant operations for similar hazardous conditions, risks, and controls. Learning content like this is highly valuable as it is based on real-world experience. We encourage everyone with publishable information about incidents to send it to us, so that we can raise awareness across the whole industry. Please contact us at secretariat@ichca.com; sharing your insight could save a life or prevent injury.        

Safety Alert: Elbow Fracture Through Trip on Vessel Deck

A Hatch Foremen working onboard the vessel opened a bar of the access point to the required deck location. As he stepped across onto the deck he tripped over a shin-height safety chain, fell,  landing on his elbow sustaining a fracture that required surgery. Direct causes: Safety chain at a low height just above the hatch lid, it was discoloured and not clearly visible.  Recommendations: Port based workers to maintain situational awareness and be aware of slip, trip and fall hazards. Task-based risk assessments / pre-job briefings should be reviewed / revised / delivered to ensure coverage of this type of vessel deck situation.   For full details, click here   Please click here for previous Safety Alerts: https://ichca.com/safety-alerts   We are grateful to the DP World London Gateway and Port Skills & Safety for providing details. We acknowledge their commitment to sharing learning to benefit others. If you have similar operations, please share this information with managers, operatives and any potentially affected third parties as appropriate. Please also review any of your relevant operations for similar hazardous conditions, risks, and controls. Learning content like this is highly valuable as it is based on real-world experience. We encourage everyone with publishable information about incidents to send it to us, so that we can raise awareness across the whole industry. Please contact us at secretariat@ichca.com; sharing your insight could save a life or prevent injury.        

Hidden Corrosion on Deck Fittings Can Cause Dangerous failures

The US Coast Guard (USCG) has shared lessons from a marine casualty that resulted in a severe injury to a crewmember onboard a cargo vessel. The incident brought to light a dangerous and potentially fatal situation involving hidden corrosion on D-ring lifting points. Three of four lifting points failed during positioning of a removable hatch cover on the vessel.  The resulting snap-back of the lifting sling assembly struck the crewmember in the head.  A significant amount of corrosion was found beneath the paint and on the underside of the straps.   There were no records of any testing conducted on the lifting points since their installation in the mid-1980s.  Nor were there any records of any D-ring replacements, indicating that they had likely been in an exterior weather deck environment for several decades.  Similar failures may occur in the absence of an established inspection and maintenance program.   The USCG strongly recommends that vessel owners, operators, marine surveyors and other maritime stakeholders:   Immediately identify high-risk D-rings and similar lifting-point fittings. High risk factors include: Age, weather exposure, and lifting load. These factors will cumulatively cause corrosion losses on the fitting, increasing its stress and fatigue vulnerability during each lifting cycle. Thoroughly inspect all high-risk lifting points for damage, hidden corrosion, and wastage. Audio gauging, pull-testing, or even replacement may be appropriate. Consult with the manufacturer’s instructions to ensure safe lifting limits are in place and that the effects of service life are considered in their determination. Establish a maintenance schedule for periodically inspecting all lifting points and audio gauging or testing any fittings as they age into high-risk status   Please click here for the full alert   Please click here for previous Safety Alerts: https://ichca.com/safety-alerts   We are grateful to the United States Coast Guard for providing details. We acknowledge their commitment to sharing learning to benefit others. If you have similar operations, please share this information with managers, operatives and any potentially affected third parties as appropriate. Please also review any of your relevant operations for similar hazardous conditions, risks, and controls. Learning content like this is highly valuable as it is based on real-world experience. We encourage everyone with publishable information about incidents to send it to us, so that we can raise awareness across the whole industry. Please contact us at secretariat@ichca.com; sharing your insight could save a life or prevent injury. The following has [...]

Safety Alert: Lifting of ISO Containers and Tanks Using Hooks and Wires

The following has been compiled to provide an overview of some of the safety principles associated with this type of operation.  Any lifting operation of this type should be undertaken by competent persons in compliance with applicable regulatory frameworks and is the responsibility of the duty holder.     The use of gantry cranes and spreaders is the optimal and preferred method for lifting ISO containers and tanks (collectively referred to as Cargo Transport Units, CTUs) in most situations.  However, not all terminals have this equipment available.  At some terminals it is therefore accepted practice to lift ISO containers and tanks using wires or chains and single-rope cranes, such as mobile harbour cranes or barge-mounted derricks.   Safety should always be considered in any lifting operation and this alert sets out some key principles when lifting any cargo including containers by hook and chain or wires.   Please click the  for the full Operational Alert If you have similar operations, please share this information with managers, operatives and any potentially affected third parties as appropriate. Please also review any of your relevant operations for similar hazardous conditions, risks, and controls. Learning content like this is highly valuable as it is based on real-world experience. We encourage everyone with publishable information about incidents to send it to us, so that we can raise awareness across the whole industry. Please contact us at secretariat@ichca.com; sharing your insight could save a life or prevent injury.        

Two catastrophic engine failures, one resulting in a fire, on board a ro-ro passenger ferry

On 26 August 2018, a ro-ro passenger ferry suffered a catastrophic main engine failure as it prepared to enter a river on its regular crossing.  This was the ferry’s second catastrophic main engine failure in less than a year, the failed engine being the replacement for the previous failure that had resulted in a fire and serious injuries to an engineer officer. On 14 December 2018, the vessel suffered a third catastrophic engine failure. On this occasion, the failed engine was a new build and had been in operation for just 389 hours..   Safety issues insufficient technical oversight of the engines’ operating parameters standards of maintenance management and quality control engine component and auxiliary system design problems a lack of clear ownership for engine maintenance and engine condition monitoring   Please click here for the details   We are grateful to the UK Marine Accident Investigation Branch for providing details.  We acknowledge their commitment to sharing learning to benefit others.  If you have similar operations, please share this information with managers, operatives and any potentially affected third parties as appropriate.  Please also review any of your relevant operations for similar hazardous conditions, risks, and controls. Learning content like this is highly valuable as it is based on real-world experience.  We encourage everyone with publishable information about incidents to send it to us, so that we can raise awareness across the whole industry.  Please contact us at  secretariat@ichca.com; sharing your insight could save a life or prevent injury.

Preliminary findings into Chlorine tank incident at the port of Aqaba

  A number of tanks containing Chlorine were being loaded onto the MV Forest 6 at the port of Aqaba on 27 June 2022.  During the operation, a tank fell and was punctured. The release of Chlorine gas resulted in the death of 13 and injury of more than 250 people.  On 3 July 2022, the head of the Aqaba Port incident investigation committee held a press conference announcing initial findings.   Please click here for the details    We are grateful to the Jordanian Chemical Process Safety Engineers Society for sharing this information. Their original report can be found on LinkedIn : https://www.linkedin.com/posts/jordanian-chemical-process-safety-engineers-society_aqabaabrport-accident-incident-activity-6950927450033827840-eoDB?utm_source=linkedin_share&utm_medium=member_desktop_web .  We acknowledge their commitment to sharing learning to benefit others.  If you have similar operations, please share this information with managers, operatives and any potentially affected third parties as appropriate.  Please also review any of your relevant operations for similar hazardous conditions, risks, and controls.   Learning content like this is highly valuable as it is based on real-world experience.  We encourage everyone with publishable information about incidents to send it to us, so that we can raise awareness across the whole industry.  Please contact us at secretariat@ichca.com; sharing your insight could save a life or prevent injury.

Serious injury to a crew member, by ship’s crane during operations on a port breakwater

  Safety Alert: Serious injury to a crew member, by ship's crane during operations on a port breakwater   A general cargo hopper dredger was engaged in the strengthening and lengthening of a port outer breakwater. The vessel’s crane was taking boulders from the cargo hold and placing them in position at the breakwater. The master, who was on duty, went forward to check previously completed maintenance work.  On the way back to the accommodation, he decided to check the status of the cargo hold. While checking the cargo, the crane turned towards the breakwater and trapped the master in between the body of the crane and the hatch coaming. The master sustained serious torso injuries.   MSIU has issued four recommendations to the Company aimed at addressing safety on the deck when the crane is in operation.  These included provision of physical barriers; a detailed handover for joining officers; risk assessment addressing operational conditions and ensuring that all crew members can communicate in the determined working language.   Please click here for the details   We are grateful to the Transport Malta Marine Safety Investigation Unit for providing details.  We acknowledge their commitment to sharing learning to benefit others.  If you have similar operations, please share this information with managers, operatives and any potentially affected third parties as appropriate.  Please also review any of your relevant operations for similar hazardous conditions, risks, and controls.   Learning content like this is highly valuable as it is based on real-world experience.  We encourage everyone with publishable information about incidents to send it to us, so that we can raise awareness across the whole industry.  Please contact us at secretariat@ichca.com; sharing your insight could save a life or prevent injury.

Fatality and serious injuries on board a bulk carrier whilst underway

Giulia I departed from the port of Norfolk, USA, bound for Bizerte, Tunisia on 26 January 2021. During the voyage, the vessel experienced inclement weather and the voyage plan was progressively amended, based on the advice received from a weather routeing service. On 29 January 2021, the eductor was started to pump out the water from the forecastle store, which was found flooded. Next day, five deck crew members, including the deck cadet, were instructed to extract the remaining water from the forecastle store and chain lockers, using portable pumps. The vessel’s course was altered to minimize the rolling and pitching and thus, facilitate the safety of the deck ratings. Whilst the crew members were covering the spurling pipes, a large wave washed over the forecastle deck. All the crew members were swept across the forecastle. Injured crew members were helped back to the accommodation. The vessel diverted to a port but one of the injured crew members succumbed to his injuries whilst en route.   Please click here for the details   We are grateful to the Transport Malta Marine Safety Investigation Unit for providing details.  We acknowledge their commitment to sharing learning to benefit others.  If you have similar operations, please share this information with managers, operatives and any potentially affected third parties as appropriate.  Please also review any of your relevant operations for similar hazardous conditions, risks, and controls.   Learning content like this is highly valuable as it is based on real-world experience.  We encourage everyone with publishable information about incidents to send it to us, so that we can raise awareness across the whole industry.  Please contact us at secretariat@ichca.com; sharing your insight could save a life or prevent injury.”

How wide is a Freight Container?

ICHCA International is committed to helping industry to learn lessons fast, learn them once and make sure that they stay learnt. This information is intended to provide all organisations in the cargo supply chain with the opportunity to consider the events and to review and adapt their own health and safety control measures to proactively prevent future incidents.   Everyone knows a freight container is 8 feet wide. The problem is that this knowledge is no longer entirely correct. “Over width” containers, containers that are wider than 8 feet (2438 mm), are seeing use in more and more trades.   Typically these “pallet-wide” containers are about an inch (24 mm) wider than a standard ISO container. This greater width is not visually noticeable and, until now, there are no required markings for these containers to alert individuals seeing them of their greater width. This has changed with the recent publication of the fourth edition of ISO 6346:2022. There have been a number of incidents and injuries because pallet wide containers have been assumed to be and have been handled like standard ISO containers.   Please click the link for the full Operational Alert   We are grateful to a member of the ICHCA Technical Panel for providing details. We acknowledge their commitment to sharing learning to benefit others. If you have similar operations, please share this information with managers, operatives and any potentially affected third parties as appropriate. Please also review any of your relevant operations for similar hazardous conditions, risks, and controls. Learning content like this is highly valuable as it is based on real-world experience. We encourage everyone with publishable information about incidents to send it to us, so that we can raise awareness across the whole industry. Please contact us at secretariat@ichca.com; sharing your insight could save a life or prevent injury.

Serious injury to a crew member – fall from height in vessel hold whilst underway

A member of the crew was working in a cargo hold, lost balance and fell from a height. This resulted in severe head, back and chest pain. The crew member was air lifted for further treatment. The safety investigation revealed that immediately prior to the fall, the casualty’s safety harness was not secured to a fixed point, whilst he was shifting his position.   Please click here for the details     We are grateful to the Transport Malta Marine Safety Investigation Unit for providing details.  We acknowledge their commitment to sharing learning to benefit others.  If you have similar operations, please share this information with managers, operatives and any potentially affected third parties as appropriate.  Please also review any of your relevant operations for similar hazardous conditions, risks, and controls.   Learning content like this is highly valuable as it is based on real-world experience.  We encourage everyone with publishable information about incidents to send it to us, so that we can raise awareness across the whole industry.  Please contact us at secretariat@ichca.com; sharing your insight could save a life or prevent injury.

Safety Alert: Fumigant poisoning on general cargo vessel with 1 person injured

A stevedore became sick after handling cans containing fumigant while discharging cargo from a general cargo vessel.  The stevedore experienced nausea, loss of balance, and nerve damage to his hand; he had an extended absence from work while recuperating.   The cargo of bagged sweet potato had been loaded at the port of origin in July 2021.  During and after loading, cans and pouches of aluminium phosphide fumigant had been placed between the bags of cargo.  The vessel sailed on 19 July.  Discharge operations at the destination port began on 10 October.  The operation was stopped following the discovery of open cans containing powder.  The crew then removed some of the fumigant from the cargo holds.  A specialist contractor subsequently brought in removed 150kg of fumigant from the cargo holds.   The stevedore became ill in the early hours of the next morning.   The fumigant was provided to the ship by one of the cargo suppliers, but it was likely that specialist fumigators were not allowed to board and deploy the fumigant due to the COVID-19 restrictions that were in force. The crew were not trained to deploy or remove the fumigant and the personal protective equipment they were wearing was inadequate for the task. The ship’s officers did not adhere to the company’s safety management system (SMS) or international guidelines on the use of fumigants.  Consequently, the fumigant was incorrectly deployed and did not fully volatilise and disperse during the voyage to the destination port. The use of the fumigant in the cargo holds was neither documented on board, nor communicated to the destination port by the master, voyage charterer, or ship management company before the vessel’s arrival.  Thus, the port was unaware of the presence of fumigant on board so did not initiate its fumigant removal protocols before clearing the vessel to start discharging cargo. The risk presented by the cans of fumigant was underestimated when they were first found, which delayed the cessation of cargo discharge, and the emergency response procedure was not strictly followed. The stevedore ingested fumigant either while working cargo or while eating and smoking after leaving the vessel.   Please click here for details   We are grateful to the UK Marine Accident Investigation Branch for providing details.  We acknowledge their commitment to sharing learning to benefit others.  If you have similar operations, please share this information with managers, operatives and any [...]

Serious injury to two crew members during an internal fuel oil transfer

Two crew were tasked with the internal transfer of fuel oil onboard a vessel in port. During the operation both crew suffered burns from the hot fuel oil. First aid was immediately provided and eventually, both crew members were transferred to a local hospital. Upon inspection of the engine room, it was observed that the fuel oil spillage originated from an open manhole cover on fuel oil settling tank no. 1.   Please click here for the details   We are grateful to the Transport Malta Marine Safety Investigation Unit for providing details.  We acknowledge their commitment to sharing learning to benefit others.  If you have similar operations, please share this information with managers, operatives and any potentially affected third parties as appropriate.  Please also review any of your relevant operations for similar hazardous conditions, risks, and controls.   Learning content like this is highly valuable as it is based on real-world experience.  We encourage everyone with publishable information about incidents to send it to us, so that we can raise awareness across the whole industry.  Please contact us at secretariat@ichca.com; sharing your insight could save a life or prevent injury.

Blocked fixed CO2 fire extinguishing system pilot hoses

On 19 September 2021, a fire broke out in the auxiliary engine room on board a roll-on/roll-off cargo ship departing a UK port. In an attempt to extinguish the fire, the ship’s crew activated the machinery space’s carbon dioxide (CO2) fire extinguishing system, but only half of the system’s gas cylinders opened. The initial investigation identified that one of the CO2 system pilot hoses was blocked due to a manufacturing defect. Several coupling leaks were also found in the pilot lines.   Please click here for the details   We are grateful to the UK Marine Accident Investigation Branch for providing details.  We acknowledge their commitment to sharing learning to benefit others.  If you have similar operations, please share this information with managers, operatives and any potentially affected third parties as appropriate.  Please also review any of your relevant operations for similar hazardous conditions, risks, and controls.   Learning content like this is highly valuable as it is based on real-world experience.  We encourage everyone with publishable information about incidents to send it to us, so that we can raise awareness across the whole industry.  Please contact us at secretariat@ichca.com; sharing your insight could save a life or prevent injury.

Lithium Battery Fire – container illegally loaded with discarded lithium batteries caught fire while enroute to a port

On August 19, 2021, a container illegally loaded with discarded lithium batteries caught fire while enroute to a port. The container was intended for a maritime voyage.  The batteries caught fire on the highway resulting in loss of the cargo, and significant damage to the shipping container.   For full details, please click here   We are grateful to the United States Coast Guard for providing details.  We acknowledge their commitment to sharing learning to benefit others.  If you have similar operations, please share this information with managers, operatives and any potentially affected third parties as appropriate.  Please also review any of your relevant operations for similar hazardous conditions, risks, and controls.   Learning content like this is highly valuable as it is based on real-world experience.  We encourage everyone with publishable information about incidents to send it to us, so that we can raise awareness across the whole industry.  Please contact us at secretariat@ichca.com; sharing your insight could save a life or prevent injury.

Fire Started from Cutting Torch Work

Crew members on a general cargo vessel in port were using an oxy-acetylene torch to remove various sea fasteners, brackets, and cargo securing points from the tween deck pontoons in a cargo hold. Sparks and molten slag from the hot work caused a fire.  Thankfully, nobody appears to have been seriously hurt.  However the fire damage to cargo exceeded $350,000 including damage from the fire directly, from the smoke, and from the water used to extinguish the fire. Damage to the ship exceeded $100,000 and included damage to the cargo hold bulkhead, access ladders and lighting system.   Please click here for the details   We are grateful to the American Club for providing details.  We acknowledge their commitment to sharing learning to benefit others.  If you have similar operations, please share this information with managers, operatives and any potentially affected third parties as appropriate.  Please also review any of your relevant operations for similar hazardous conditions, risks, and controls.   Learning content like this is highly valuable as it is based on real-world experience.  We encourage everyone with publishable information about incidents to send it to us, so that we can raise awareness across the whole industry.  Please contact us at secretariat@ichca.com; sharing your insight could save a life or prevent injury.

Fatal fall from overhead crane raised walkway following access panel failure

An electrician was repairing wiring that had been causing a short circuit on the lifting equipment of a large overhead gantry crane. As he was walking along the crane’s walkway, an access panel gave way beneath his feet, causing him to fall through to the ground below. The casualty sustained fatal injuries and was pronounced dead at hospital. An investigation by the Health and Safety Executive (HSE) found the company had failed to maintain the crane walkway’s access panels, which had been used to replace lighting fittings some months earlier. Also, the panel itself had been subject to weld repair, and there was no evidence of any steps being taken to ensure that the panel was safely replaced into the void and secured to ensure it did not fail. Please click here for the details We are grateful to the HSE for providing details.  We acknowledge their commitment to sharing learning to benefit others.  If you have similar operations, please share this information with managers, operatives and any potentially affected third parties as appropriate.  Please also review any of your relevant operations for similar hazardous conditions, risks, and controls.   Learning content like this is highly valuable as it is based on real-world experience.  We encourage everyone with publishable information about incidents to send it to us, so that we can raise awareness across the whole industry.  Please contact us at secretariat@ichca.com; sharing your insight could save a life or prevent injury.

Falls Not Falling

Since the beginning of 2022, Signal Mutual in the USA has experienced 10 fall injuries resulting in severe injury.  This alert lists the ten incidents and includes guidance on fall prevention.  We know that falling from height is a significant risk in the cargo industry and that huge effort is put into managing this risk.  The information here from Signal Mutual is a valuable and timely reminder to keep ‘fall from height’ firmly on any cargo organisation’s radar. Evaluate work areas together for fall hazards, acting immediately on any identified significant risk and providing an ongoing review of the work areas Manage the risk of falls – start at the top of the hierarchy of controls, eliminate the hazard where practicable, and put into place suitable and sufficient controls where the hazard cannot be eliminated Please click the link for the full Operational Alert We are grateful to Signal Mutual for providing details. We acknowledge their commitment to sharing learning to benefit others. If you have similar operations, please share this information with managers, operatives, and any potentially affected third parties as appropriate. Please also review any of your relevant operations for similar hazardous conditions, risks, and controls.  Learning content like this is highly valuable as it is based on real-world experience. We encourage everyone with publishable information about incidents to send it to us so that we can raise awareness across the whole industry. Please contact us at secretariat@ichca.com; sharing your insight could save a life or prevent injury.”

Ship Access

Signal Mutual have been made aware of a near miss incident involving a vessel gangway that was not safely footed on the pier.  While re-positioning the hoist line parted, causing the gangway to fall into the water. Please click here for the full Operational Alert We are grateful to the Signal Mutual for providing details.  We acknowledge their commitment to sharing learning to benefit others.  If you have similar operations, please share this information with managers, operatives and any potentially affected third parties as appropriate.  Please also review any of your relevant operations for similar hazardous conditions, risks, and controls.   Learning content like this is highly valuable as it is based on real-world experience.  We encourage everyone with publishable information about incidents to send it to us, so that we can raise awareness across the whole industry.  Please contact us at secretariat@ichca.com; sharing your insight could save a life or prevent injury.

Obstructed View Accident

Signal Mutual have been made aware of an incident involving a collision between a cargo towing vehicle and a stationary pickup truck. The learning points include maintaining fields of vision free of obstructions, avoiding distraction whilst driving and awareness of pedestrians and vehicles in the vicinity of operations.   Please click here for the full Operational Alert   We are grateful to the Signal Mutual for providing details.  We acknowledge their commitment to sharing learning to benefit others.  If you have similar operations, please share this information with managers, operatives and any potentially affected third parties as appropriate.  Please also review any of your relevant operations for similar hazardous conditions, risks, and controls.   Learning content like this is highly valuable as it is based on real-world experience.  We encourage everyone with publishable information about incidents to send it to us, so that we can raise awareness across the whole industry.  Please contact us at secretariat@ichca.com; sharing your insight could save a life or prevent injury.

Abrasive Blasting

Signal Mutual have been made aware that over 130 serious incidents associated with abrasive blasting during the period January 2019 through to June 2021. Abrasive blasting is a potentially hazardous operation if not correctly controlled. Abrasive blasting can expose the blaster and other workers in the area to serious risks from contact with high pressure particles and dust, and in some cases, uncontrolled high-pressure hoses.   Please click here for the full Operational Alert   We are grateful to the Signal Mutual for providing details.  We acknowledge their commitment to sharing learning to benefit others.  If you have similar operations, please share this information with managers, operatives and any potentially affected third parties as appropriate.  Please also review any of your relevant operations for similar hazardous conditions, risks, and controls.   Learning content like this is highly valuable as it is based on real-world experience.  We encourage everyone with publishable information about incidents to send it to us, so that we can raise awareness across the whole industry.  Please contact us at secretariat@ichca.com; sharing your insight could save a life or prevent injury.

Seatruck Consultative Procedure – RoRo Operations

Seatruck carried out extensive research into their operations following a fatal accident on the vehicle deck of a RoRo Ferry in July 2021.  A member of the vessel crew suffered crushing injuries whilst marshalling tractor-unit drivers loading semi-trailers. Against Seatruck’s procedures, the crew member was positioned between a moving semi-trailer and vessel structure in the final bay of the loading operation. Development of this procedure has been supported by vessel-based trials and internal consultation with ship’s crew and stevedores which is ongoing, therefore the information contained is provisional but is deemed to be of value to members. A follow-up Safety Bulletin will be sent out if the consultation leads to a significant change to the procedures detailed.   Please Click Here  for the full Operational Alert   We are grateful to Seatruck for sharing a high impact procedural / process development for RoRo operations on vehicle decks and to PSS for drawing it to our attention.  We acknowledge their commitment to sharing learning to benefit others. If you have similar operations, please share this information with managers, operatives and any potentially affected third parties as appropriate. Please also review any of your relevant operations for similar hazardous conditions, risks, and controls.   Learning content like this is highly valuable as it is based on real-world experience. We encourage everyone with publishable information about incidents to send it to us, so that we can raise awareness across the whole industry. Please contact us at secretariat@ichca.com; sharing your insight could save a life or prevent injury

Falling Objects – Working Overhead

Hutchison Ports have recently received reports of a hammer head that detached from its handle when ship’s crew were attempting to loosen a 3 high lashing bar locked into a container above. The hammer head hit a stevedore, who was working 6 metres below, on the shoulder.   Please Click Here  for the full Operational Alert   We are grateful to the  Hutchison Ports for providing details.  We acknowledge their commitment to sharing learning to benefit others.  If you have similar operations, please share this information with managers, operatives and any potentially affected third parties as appropriate.  Please also review any of your relevant operations for similar hazardous conditions, risks, and controls.   Learning content like this is highly valuable as it is based on real-world experience.  We encourage everyone with publishable information about incidents to send it to us, so that we can raise awareness across the whole industry.  Please contact us at secretariat@ichca.com; sharing your insight could save a life or prevent injury.

Lashing Bar Tongues separating from the lashing bar and onto the deck

Hutchison Ports have recently received reports of Lashing Bar Tongues separating from the lashing bar and falling onto the deck, narrowly missing the stevedores. The failures have occurred where the nut has unwound from the bolt, or the pin has failed due to wear and tear and lack of maintenance.   Please click the link for the full Operational Alert   We are grateful to the Hutchison Ports for providing details.  We acknowledge their commitment to sharing learning to benefit others.  If you have similar operations, please share this information with managers, operatives and any potentially affected third parties as appropriate.  Please also review any of your relevant operations for similar hazardous conditions, risks, and controls.   Learning content like this is highly valuable as it is based on real-world experience.  We encourage everyone with publishable information about incidents to send it to us, so that we can raise awareness across the whole industry.  Please contact us at secretariat@ichca.com; sharing your insight could save a life or prevent injury

Failure of a Road Tanker Pressure/Vacuum Relief Valve

Hazardous vapour release due to unauthorised modification of pressure/vacuum relief valve on bulk transport container.   Please Click Here  for the full Operational Alert   We are grateful to The UK Health and Safety Executive for providing details.  We acknowledge their commitment to sharing learning to benefit others.  If you have similar operations, please share this information with managers, operatives and any potentially affected third parties as appropriate.  Please also review any of your relevant operations for similar hazardous conditions, risks, and controls.   Learning content like this is highly valuable as it is based on real-world experience.  We encourage everyone with publishable information about incidents to send it to us, so that we can raise awareness across the whole industry.  Please contact us at secretariat@ichca.com; sharing your insight could save a life or prevent injury.

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